Biography


Hayek: A Biography

by Dr. Alan Ebenstein

This book tells the story of one of the most important public figures of the twentieth century. It is the first full biography of Friedrich Hayek, the Austrian economist who became, over the course of a remarkable career, the great philosopher of liberty in our time. In this richly detailed portrait, Alan Ebenstein chronicles the life, works, and legacy of a visionary thinker, from Hayek’s early years as the scholarly son of a physician in fin-de-siecle Vienna on an increasingly wider world as an economist and political philosopher in London, New York, and Chicago



The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan

by Sebastian Mallaby

Sebastian Mallaby’s magisterial biography of Alan Greenspan, the product of over five years of research based on untrammeled access to his subject and his closest professional and personal intimates, brings into vivid focus the mysterious point where the government and the economy meet. To understand Greenspan’s story is to see the economic and political landscape of the last 30 years–and the presidency from Reagan to George W. Bush–in a whole new light…



Ten Great Economists: From Marx to Keynes

by Joseph A. Schumpeter

Brilliant evaluations of the men most influential in shaping economic thought: Marx, Walras, Menger, Marshall, Pareto, Bohm-Bawerk, Taussig, Fisher, Mitchell and Keynes, In he Appendix: Knapp, von Wiser and Bortkiewitz.



Irving Fisher: A Biography

by Robert Loring Allen

Irving Fisher was one of the greatest and certainly one of the most colorful American economists. Widely acknowledged as the chief architect of modern neo-classical economics, he was a writer and teacher of prodigious scope and output whose business career included the earning of a fortune from the invention of a card index system, and its subsequent loss in the Great Crash. He was also an active campaigner for numerous causes, including world peace, prohibition, and 100 percent deposit reserve money.



Prophet of Innovation: Joseph Schumpeter and Creative Destruction

by Thomas K. McCraw

Described by John Kenneth Galbraith as “the most sophisticated conservative” of the twentieth century, Schumpeter made his mark as the prophet of incessant change. His vision was stark: Nearly all businesses fail, victims of innovation by their competitors. Businesspeople ignore this lesson at their peril―to survive, they must be entrepreneurial and think strategically. Yet in Schumpeter’s view, the general prosperity produced by the “capitalist engine” far outweighs the wreckage it leaves behind.
Forbes christened Schumpeter the best navigator through the turbulent seas of globalization. Time has proved that assessment accurate.


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